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Dutch Oven, who's got one?

Overland1

Administrator
Staff member
I've been contemplating getting a small dutch oven since they are so versatile. My concern is the cooking time. After a long day on the trail I don't want to be spending 20-30 minutes prepping dinner and then waiting a hour for it to cook.
 

jerdog53

Moderator
Potjie is a round, cast iron, three-legged pot, the potjie, descended from the Dutch oven brought from the Netherlands to South Africa in the 17th century and found in the homes and villages of people throughout southern Africa. The pot is heated using small amounts of wood or charcoal or, if fuel is scarce, twisted grass or even dried animal dung.

As per http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Potjiekos

The main difference that appeals to me is the longer legs on the Potjie allowing better heat control. They still have the flat lid allowing coals to be added to the top for even heat, lids with lips to control moisture loss better and handles for the pot and lid just like a Dutch oven.
 

Overland1

Administrator
Staff member
I think I want a dutch oven just so I can say I cooked a pizza in the middle of nowhere which is funny since I wouldn't do it at home. Looks like we might have to break down and get a something for the trail, those pizzas look good.
 

nuclearlemon

Active Member
that's part of the issue...i literally know nothing about cooking...i wouldn't even know what to bring.

my ex bf had two lodge ovens (that we never used), so i'll might get one of those...i ve been on one run where about five people had dutch ovens and we had a 5' campfire ring with all about 9 ovens going cooking everything from biscuits to soe sort of apple desert (just because i'm a woman...a wellfed one at that, does not mean i have a clue about desert, or other food terminology...so stfu and quit laughing at me ;). ).
it was sooooo cool to see all the stuff they came up with.
 

Overland1

Administrator
Staff member
When we are out on the trail together I'll teach you some things, being a trained chef helps ;), but if you can start getting the basics understood the rest comes easy.
 

nuclearlemon

Active Member
being a trained chef helps ;), .
ooooohhhh....trained chef.....so, i've been trying to use up a box of bisquick so i can get it out of the house (cutting back on monsanto) and i've been using it for pizza crust using the online recipe of 1/3 hot water to 1 1/2 cups monsanto and the crust falls apart...what can i do to create a durable crust?
 

Overland1

Administrator
Staff member
I've never used Bisquick and while I've seen it on the shelf I don't really know what's in it. My guess it's a sort of instant flour mix thing.

Pizza dough is more of a bread and needs yeast to make it work. The essentials are:

Flour - bread flour will give it crispy crust while all purpose flour is more chewy
Dry yeast - this give it the elasticness you see when people toss and spin the dough as well as making it rise
A little sugar - something for the yeast to eat
Warm water - to make the dough and the heat will activate the yeast
Olive oil - this is used as a fat to give fluffiness as well as enhanced flavor
Salt - brings out the flavor

To make the dough you combine all the dry ingredients and then add the oil and water until it forms a ball. Then you knead the dough buy pressing it flat then folding it over and pressing it flat again. Repeat for 10 minutes or so. Needing gets the yeast activated and folds in air so they can grow. Next step is to set it aside for an hour or so and let the yeast grow, the dough will usually double in size and become more elastic. At this point you're ready to roll the dough and start your toppings.

That's the basics but if you want the detailed list here is a link with measurements, etc.
http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/jamie-oliver/pizza-dough-recipe.html
 

nuclearlemon

Active Member
so the "recipe" is as i listed, which they tell you to only mix 20 times (betty f'n crocker baby). i've found the whole whisk thing is a joke, but i did what i could then jambed it all in by hand and mushed it flat using a beer bottle as a roller (no, i do not have a roller, yes, i do have a lot of beer bottles).

i've since found recipes that mention adding sour cream or "processed cheese" (i assume that's monsanto cheese ;). )

should i add something?...or should i buck up and deal with crumbling crusts?

the only reason i'm doing this is to use up the bisquick...otherwise i'd just buy a bobelli
 

XTorrey

New Member
I think Bisquick is primarily flour, baking soda, and baking powder mixed to a certain ratio. Have you tried doing a quick yeast-based pizza dough? Bread is pretty darn easy once you get the hang of it, and kneading dough can be an excellent stress reliever. ;) I'm not a trained chef but I'd be happy to show you some camp cooking if we're ever out together. Menu planning and camp cooking are two of my favorite things when overlanding is involved.
 

Overland1

Administrator
Staff member
Front Runner has been doing some really nice stuff. This is a great idea for something bulky and needs to be secured.
 

jerdog53

Moderator
So I worked up a biscuit recipe last week and ran it through the Dutch oven in the house oven to prove it out before adding to the chaos of a camp fire, they turned out well!